The illusion of conscious will (eBook, 2002) [Beloit College]
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The illusion of conscious will

The illusion of conscious will

Author: Daniel M Wegner
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2002.
Series: Bradford book.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
A novel contribution to the age-old debate about free will versus determinism. Do we consciously cause our actions, or do they happen to us? Philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists, theologians, and lawyers have long debated the existence of free will versus determinism. In this book Daniel Wegner offers a novel understanding of the issue. Like actions, he argues, the feeling of conscious will is created by the  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Wegner, Daniel M., 1948-
Illusion of conscious will.
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2002
(DLC) 2001054608
(OCoLC)48256405
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Daniel M Wegner
ISBN: 9780262285896 0262285894 0585442738 9780585442730
OCLC Number: 51958441
Notes: "A Bradford book."
Awards: Winner of Selected as a Finalist in the category of Psychology/Mental Health in the 2002 Independent Publisher Book Awards (IPPYs) presented by Independent Publisher Magazine. 2002
Runner-up for IndieFab awards (Philosophy) 2002
Commended for Independent Publisher Book Awards (Psychology) 2003
Description: 1 online resource (xi, 405 pages) : illustrations
Contents: 1. The illusion --
2. Brain and body --
3. The experience of will --
4. An analysis of automatism --
5. Protecting the illusion --
6. Action projection --
7. Virtual agency --
8. Hypnosis and will --
9. The mind's compass.
Series Title: Bradford book.
Responsibility: Daniel M. Wegner.

Abstract:

A novel contribution to the age-old debate about free will versus determinism. Do we consciously cause our actions, or do they happen to us? Philosophers, psychologists, neuroscientists, theologians, and lawyers have long debated the existence of free will versus determinism. In this book Daniel Wegner offers a novel understanding of the issue. Like actions, he argues, the feeling of conscious will is created by the mind and brain. Yet if psychological and neural mechanisms are responsible for all human behavior, how could we have conscious will? The feeling of conscious will, Wegner shows, helps us to appreciate and remember our authorship of the things our minds and bodies do. Yes, we feel that we consciously will our actions, Wegner says, but at the same time, our actions happen to us. Although conscious will is an illusion, it serves as a guide to understanding ourselves and to developing a sense of responsibility and morality. Approaching conscious will as a topic of psychological study, Wegner examines the issue from a variety of angles. He looks at illusions of the will--those cases where people feel that they are willing an act that they are not doing or, conversely, are not willing an act that they in fact are doing. He explores conscious will in hypnosis, Ouija board spelling, automatic writing, and facilitated communication, as well as in such phenomena as spirit possession, dissociative identity disorder, and trance channeling. The result is a book that sidesteps endless debates to focus, more fruitfully, on the impact on our lives of the illusion of conscious will.
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